Japanese gardens - 日本 庭園

Zen Buddhism conquered Japan in the mid-12th century, resulting in the emergence of japanese zen gardens. 
In Japan it is important to develop a japanese garden, it is an art to be respected. The japanese seek to reproduce in their garden a natural site with water, islands, hills and mountains.
 
The same basic components are always found in the Japanese garden: the tea pavilion, the japanese step (a stone path), rocks, water, sand, lanterns, a fountain, bamboos, trees and shrubs, aquatic plants, ground cover plants.
This art in its own right is based on techniques combining perspective, dynamics and abstraction. A japanese garden is never explicit, there are hidden sides that you discover while exploring space.
 
There are 3 main classifications of japanese gardens:
- shizen fûkeishiki : gardens which represent nature in miniature.
- karesansui : dry gardens, strongly inspired by zen buddhism and intended for meditation. Sand and gravel replace water.
- chaniwa : the tea gardens leading to the tea pavilion.
 
The miniature japanese gardens will allow you to have your small garden inside your home.

Jardins japonais

Jardins japonais